Home > Learning Activity 5-A-1: Edison Sound Recordings > Group A 5-A-1 Workspace

Final Worksheet




5+ Ways to Use in the Classroom


Social Studies: 2 activities

* This would be a fun way to start a study of types of communities, starting with the rural/farm community, in social studies. After discussing rural communities, the children could compare the present with the past. The children would listen for objects that people used in 1915, when the automobile was young. For example, Uncle Joe drove a buckboard rather than a car. He ordered the car with a mail order catalogue. The car had a crank and levers. There was a covered bridge. The audio would promote listening skills. The children could use a SEA(C) chart.
Critical thinking skills: The children are comparing and contrasting (same/different). In doing this, they are classifying in a sense.

* Students could research the first automobile. They could find out what it looked like, how it worked, how much it cost and on average, how many people owned an automobile. Students could present this information to the class in the form of a brochure or power point presentation.
Critical thinking skills: The children are analyzing and synthesizing data and creating a presentation.

Writing: 2 activities
*This recording could be used as an example of a good narrative. After discussing the elements of a narrative, the students could listen to this story for these elements and write a narrative of their own. Students could use a story map as a graphic organizer as they listen to the story. Then they could use another story map to incorporate the same elements to write their own stories.
Critical thinking skills: The children need to evaluate the good story elements. They need to summarize the story elements and apply these elements in their stories. They need to create a story.

*Students could write a compare/contrast essay titled "First Automobile Yesterday and Today". Students would use a Venn Diagram and list ideas while listening to the audio clip about what the experience of buying an automobile was for Uncle Josh, they could interview their parents to complete the "today" part of the Venn Diagram. Using the Venn Diagram as a pre-writing tool, students could write an essay comparing and contrasting automobile purchase experiences.
Critical thinking skills: The children are comparing and contrasting, listing, and making connections.

Art:
In art class, the children could illustrate the story. After listening to the story, they could listen again for clarification and questions. Then, they could listen again, focusing on the part they would like to illustrate, and take notes. Finally, they could listen as they draw.
Critical thinking skills: The children need to consider the possibilities and evaluate the part of the story they want to illustrate. They create an illustration.

Mathematics: 2 activities:
  • While listening to the audio clip students will take notes about the amount it cost to buy the automobile. We would listen again, to make sure we didn't miss anything. Together as a class, we will list the items used to pay for the automobile. Students will write a rough price estimate for each item, since the automobile was paid for with goods. I will provide the original cost of an automobile to students and we will calculate the difference, between their estimated amount and exact amount.
  • While listening to the audio clip, students will write down a list of items damaged in the first run of the automobile. Students will create a cost estimate of damages. Students will share their estimates with a parnter.
Critical thinking skills: The children are calculating and appraising.


Reasons Why We ChoseThis Story and How It Promotes Critical Thinking Skills

We chose this because it is funny. It will be effective with students because it will engage their interest with the humor and with its sense of history. It leaves a lot to the imagination for students and teachers. It opens the opportunity for various open ended activities.

It will promote critical thinking skills in several ways. Many of our activities are open ended. Children are using inductive reasoning in finding common characteristics; they are analyzing as they categorize; they are comparing, creating, and calculating

___

Worksheets





Uncle Josh Buys an Automobile

Group Discussion



Kellie, this should be fun. Why don't you pick out a few audios; I will, too. We'll see if we choose any of the same. If not, at least we've narrowed them down. We can go from there. Liz

Kellie, What a feeling to think these were recorded so long ago. I liked "Uncle Josh Buys his First Automobile," "The Three Bears," and "Stars and Stripes." Any of the others would be fine, too. You always have good ideas. Liz
Wow Liz, we have to go with Uncle Josh buys the car- that is the funniest thing I've heard in ages. I wonder if we can find the script to it somewhere? I had 2 application ideas for students, one would be a language arts activity and the 2nd a mathematics one- Since it is a little hard to understand at first, my first thought was for kids to write down unknown words and any clues that would lead them to the main idea and supporting details of the story (without telling them the title), the class could have a discussion and listen again or for them to figure out a story map kind of graphic organizer from listeneing to it, after listening a few times they could read the script and compare ideas- For math, I thought it would be cute if we could have them figure out how much the car cost them back then (as it mentioned quite a list of items sold to get it) and they could keep a list of the damage done for some math ideas- and maybe get a total for that. I'm still laughing, I really liked it. Let me know what you had in mind.Kellie

Kellie, Great ideas!

Some other ways to use this audio:
This would be a fun way to start a study of types of communities, starting with the rural/farm community, in social studies. After discussing rural communities, the children could compare the present with the past. The children would listen for objects that people used in 1915, when the automobile was young. For example, Uncle Joe drove a buckboard rather than a car. He ordered the car with a mail order catalogue. The car had a crank and levers. There was a covered bridge. The audio would promote listening skills.
For writing, this could be used as an example of a good narrative. After discussing the elements of a narrative, the students could listen to this story for these elements and write a narrative of their own.
In art class, the children could illustrate the story. It leaves a lot to the imagination!We chose this because it is funny. It will be effective with students because it will engage their interest with the humor and with its sense of history.
It will promote critical thinking skills in several ways. Many of our activities are open ended. Children are using inductive reasoning in finding common characteristics; they are analyzing as they categorize; they are comparing, creating, and calculating. Liz

Kellie, We're supposed to write some of our presentation on a separate wiki page. Do you know what this means? Liz
Hi Liz, I don't know what this means and I checked other groups discussion area, it is blank also.

Kellie, I added a new page, but do not know where it went :) Liz

Hi, Kellie,
Michelle asked about the separate page on the Question Forum. We can use this page, but set up our answers in a more formal way. After our discussion section, we can formalize our ideas in the spaces at the top. I'll set them up and get started. Feel free to make changes. Liz

Looks great, Kellie! Liz same! thanks.