Home > Learning Activity 2-A-1: Annotated Sources



Learning Activity 2-A-1 Wiki Instructions


To add a link:

  1. Click the Edit tab in the upper-right corner.
  2. Scroll down the page until you see the first "Link Goes Here."
  3. Highlight the "Link Goes Here" text.
  4. Click on the Link button on the Editor bar.
  5. Click the External Link tab.
  6. In the Link Text field, enter the name of your resource.
  7. In Address field, enter the entire web address for your resource.
  8. Select the New Window checkbox.
  9. Click the Add Link button.
  10. Under your link, highlight the "Your Name" text.
  11. Type your name.
  12. Press Save on the Editor bar.

To add an annotation:

  1. After reviewing a resource, click the Edit tab in the upper-right corner.
  2. Scroll down the page until you see the resource you reviewed.
  3. Highlight the "Annotations" text directly under the resource.
  4. Type your annotations.
  5. Under your annotations, highlight the "Your Name" text.
  6. Type your name.
  7. Press Save on the Editor bar.


Annotated Sources


United Streaming

Theresa Palmer

This link connects to Discovery Education, created by the Discovery Channel. At the top of the page there are tabs for Administrator, Teacher, Parent, and Student resources. Some of the resources must be purchased. At the bottom of the page are more links for free resources, including lesson plans, differentiated by grade levels. This leads to links by either subject or grade level. One of these links takes you to Kathy Schrock's list of resources (she presents the power point in our second module). One site, for example, includes lesson plans about learning history in one's own community. Discovery Education also presents travel opportunities, webinars, and contests. This site is quite a "Discovery."

One can find resources for Science, Math, English, Social Studies, Health, and Technology. Primary sources include interactive maps, photographs, and videos. Live streaming is its most important primary source, as its name indicates. However, this must be purchased. There are also links to primary sources. Its purpose is to provide resources for education.

Elizabeth Voltz

Treasures of the Nation

Theresa Palmer

Displays US museum exhibit information. Links to museum exhibits, treasures and publications. Using museum galleries to teach and some of the exhibits feature Civil War or Revolutionary War item..
Kellie

American Folk Song Collection

Theresa Palmer

At The American Folk Song Collection you can:

  • Search for songs using a powerful database (Search the Collection)
  • Print lyrics, musical scores, song analysis, background information and game directions
  • Listen to field recordings from the Library of Congress and other sources
  • View short films on the history, philosophy and teaching applications of the work of Zoltán Kodály (The Kodály Vision)
  • Learn more about the collection and other learning resources (The Kodály Center)
  • Locate folk song resources
  • Look up unfamiliar terms
Kellie DiBattista

Historic Pittsburgh

Elizabeth Voltz

This website chronicles a history of Pittsburgh through several mediums: texts, maps, images and census just to name a few. This website provides a comprehensive history of Pittsburgh additionally through the chronology link as well. The site provides the sources needed to research a general history of Pittsburgh or a specific person or site.
Jenna Valleau

PBS Kids: Official Site

Elizabeth Voltz

This is a well organized site centered on The Mr.Rogers show. The site is nicely divided in to two sections: children and teachers. Clicking on the teachers link will take you directly to a page of thematic lesson plans based on the weekly lesson of the show. In addition to the weekly lessons the site interestingly enough has information about dealing with death in general and the passing of Fred Rogers.
Jenna Valleau

Pittsburgh Post Gazette

Elizabeth Voltz

This link is actually a link to a newspaper archive, it advertises access to over 182 million newspaper articles or clippings.

Kellie DiBattista

Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission

Kellie DiBattista

The PHMC, which was created in 1945, is responsible for collecting, conserving, and interpreting Pennsylvania's historic heritage. The mission of PHMC is to preserve the “Commonwealth's memory as a teacher and champion of its heritage for citizens of Pennsylvania and the nation.” This is accomplished through using many state resources such as the Pennsylvania State Archives, the State Museum of Pennsylvania, and Bureau of Historic Sites and Museums, and many more.

Theresa Palmer

State Museum of Pennsylvania

Kellie DiBattista

The State Museum of Pennsylvania has educational programs designed for people to explore and experience from Earth’s beginning to the present. There is a Planetarium, archaeological artifacts, minerals, paintings, and art that are representative to the Commonwealth’s heritage. There is a hands on learning center that has programs specifically designed for teachers and school aged students.
Theresa Palmer

Pennsylvania Archaeological Council

Kellie DiBattista

The Pennsylvania Archaeological Council (PAC) is a statewide organization of archaeologists. Its purpose is to promote Pennsylvania archaeology and to educate others about it. The site includes PAC reports of projects that propose or review archaeological investigation in Pennsylvania. The site also provides links to other archaeological sites and organizations. Its link to ArchNet connects to a World Wide Web virtual library for archaeology, leading to more comprehensive information. In ArchNet, the topics are far-reaching, from astronomy to ceramics. It also provides educational resources, which include primary sources of photographs of digs and artifacts and maps.

Elizabeth Voltz

Duke University Digital Collections

  • Michelle Foreman
These digital collections include rare Walt Whitman manuscripts, historic photography, landscapes, sheet music, books, advertising, Confederacy history, and medical history, as well as many other primary sources. They are indexed by name, genre, subject, creator, date, and place. The site notes its most popular collections and provides space for the Digital Collection Blog and Twitter. There are links to the Duke website and Facebook, too. The purpose of this site is to provide digital primary resources for research.

Elizabeth Voltz

Ad Access- John W. Harlman Center for Sales, Advertising, and Marketing History
  • Michelle Foreman

The Emergence of Advertising in America presents over 9000 images that show how the consumer culture rose after the Civil War. It also documents through pictures the birth of professionalized advertising in the United States. The materials in this collection come from Rare Books, Manuscripts, and Special Collections Library at Duke University. The purpose of this project is to make rare advertising items widely available for study and research. Some materials are available wit essays, a timeline, or even a bibliography.
Theresa Palmer

Salem Witch Trials Documentary Archive and Transcription Project

  • Michelle Foreman

This site is an invaluable resource for any teacher who is studying The Crucible or teaching the witch trials in class. Reading the primary sources on the site itself or visiting links to the online archives will provide historical data on the majority of those needlessly put to trial during those horrific months. Court documents including signed confessions are available

Jenna Valleau

/Northeastern University Libraries

Jenna Valleau

This is an excellent site provided by Northeastern University that provides links to many subscription and free online resources for primary sources. A wide range of primary source databases is provided at the top of the page. While you must be a Northeastern student to access these, it is useful to know the names of the databases in case you can access them from your local college or university. The online links provide access to newspaper archives, classic online books, medieval resources, Shakespearean sources, and many more, ranging from early to present time periods.

  • Michelle Foreman

National Park Service Website

Jenna Valleau

This National Park Service website provides many images, as well as a "discover history" link. This link provides access to other links, many related to the National Park Service museum. It also provides sources and information relating to the boyhood homes of the U.S. Presidents, the Revolutionary War, and Rosa Parks. There are side links for people, places, and stories in history. This site functions well to provide connections with primary source resources that can be related to various national parks.

  • Michelle Foreman

Eyewitness to History

Jenna Valleau

The Eyewitness to History site bills itself as a "ringside seat to history--from the Ancient World to the present. . . . through the eyes of those who lived it." There are tabs for all major historical time periods, and each tab provides primary source images and quotations that are integrated into original secondary source content. For example, the tab on the Middle Ages provides a link to primary and secondary information on Christopher Columbus. This information provides primary source resources such as sections from Christopher Columbus's journal. This is an excellent resource for the researcher who is seeking an introduction to important events of different time periods, with access to primary source content.

  • Michelle Foreman

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