Home > Learning Activity 3-D-1: Documents, Data, and Cartoons Lesson Plan


Learning Activity 3-D-1 Wiki Instructions


To add your lesson plan:

  1. Click the Edit tab in the upper-right corner.
  2. Scroll down the page until you see the first empty lesson plan space.
  3. Highlight the "Your Name" text.
  4. Type your name.
  5. Highlight the "Enter Lesson Plan here." text.
  6. Type or copy and paste your lesson plan..
  7. Press Save on the Editor bar.

To comment on a classmate's lesson plan:

  1. Click on the Discussion tab at the top of the page.
  2. Click the New Post button.
  3. In the Subject field, enter the name of your classmate followed by "Lesson Plan Feedback" (ex. Laura's Lesson Plan Feedback).
  4. In the Message field, type in your feedback.
  5. Click Post.

Theresa's Lesson Plan

After reviewing the document http://www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt?open=512&objID=8642&PageID=608722&mode=2&contentid=http://pubcontent.state.pa.us/publishedcontent/publish/cop_environment/phmc/communities/extranet/history/ourdocumentaryheritage/1865___1945/railroad_riots_1877.html/1865___1945/railroad_riots_1877.html and political cartoon http://loc.gov/pictures/resource/cph.3b10757students will create a 4 measure (16 beat) rap which highlights what life would have been like for people living in Ridgway in 1880, the year the Borough was established.
*Students will use the NARA worksheet for both the document and cartoon examples. Students need the in depth analysis tool to help them to focus on more than just the concrete facts but requires they dig deeper and that they speculate about what life would have been like.
*After the students complete the worksheet individually they will break into small groups and use a Venn diagram to come up with common descriptive words that could be used in the Rap.
*The final project will be the group performance of the 4 measure 16 beat rap.
*Critical thinking skills will be used to find the key descriptive words that will be used in the rap. Not only do they need to describe what life would be like but also use a specific rhythm pattern and rhyming words so that the rap flows and follows the correct form.
*This lesson integrates into the music curriculum by having students create, notate and perform their own music.

Kellie DiBattista

Learning Activity 3-D-1
Documents, Data, and Cartoons Lesson Plan (actual cartoons are attached here in this document)

Language Arts Lesson Plan
Topic: “Benjamin Franklin in Colonial America non-fiction introduction to Ben and Me by Robert Lawson
Objectives:
· Students will explore and discover societal issues as they relate to the time-period of America’s beginning as a nation during the life of Benjamin Franklin.
· Students will understand the connection between historical facts and historical fiction and be able to distinguish fact from fiction or make-believe.
· Students will analyze documents to create a character analysis of Benjamin Franklin as a pre-reading activity
· Students will use primary resources to answer questions about Benjamin Franklin and Colonial America to build background knowledge before reading the novel, Ben and Me by Robert Lawson

Introduction: Analyze this political cartoon using the SEA document.
Introduction: Students will complete a KWL chart about Benjamin Franklin, they will share what they know and want to know with a partner. Teacher will help students evaluate “know” portion of KWL charts as a whole group activity.
With a partner students will analyze this political cartoon using the SEA document.
As an introduction to Benjamin Franklin and Colonial America, students will analyze this very popular political cartoon. We will discuss the images and abbreviations and search for meaning. After each student has had time to analyze the cartoon, we will discuss our theories and add to our KWL charts.
I will explain to students that this cartoon is about the "disunited state" of the colonies, it helped Benjamin Franklin show how important it was for the colonies to be united. There was a superstition that a snake which had been cut into pieces would come back to life if the pieces were put together before sunset. For additional information, I will have students read this attached article:
http://www.nieonline.com/cftc/pdfs/joinordie.pdf

Next, I will have students use an SEA document to analyze this political cartoon with the same partner. Students will then use a Venn diagram to compare and contrast the two cartoons both published by Benjamin Franklin. They will use the cartoons to answer these specific questions:
1. What have you learned about Benjamin Franklin?
2. What did you learn about issues in the United States?
3. What would you like learn more about?
During Reading activity:
Students will read together in small leveled groups, Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin page 1
http://www.earlyamerica.com/lives/franklin/chapt1/
Meet together as a whole group to discuss information or questions gained from p. 1., for homework students will use the internet to add information to KWL charts.

Additional challenge: check out this link to a famous book written by Benjamin Franklin called Poor Richard’s Almanac
http://hdl.library.upenn.edu/1017.12/13616
This will lead us into our fictional unit of Ben and Me by Robert Lawson.




==

==

Jenna's Lesson Plan

Lesson Plan
3-D-1
Primary Source documents and the Holocaust

Objectives:
· SWBAT understand and analyze the negative attitude that the Nazis had against the Jews through viewing propaganda and primary source document s.
· SWBAT identify the modes of propaganda through speech, visuals and doctrines
· SWBAT analyze the effectiveness of said propaganda
· SWBAT utilize propaganda skills to promote an outlandish idea to demonstrate its power on people
· SWBAT begin to recognize how the people of Germany were trained to believe that the Jewish people were the enemy

Procedure:
1. Journal: KWL sheet ( first two boxes) What do you know about the Nazi attempt to terminate the Jewish people?
2. Teacher introduces the “ Jewish question “ using powerpoint and students complete what they can of the KWL sheet
3. Students break in groups of two and are given assignment sheets, heading to computer lab.
4. Teacher will redefine propaganda and ask students to give modern examples of its use in our society.
5. Students examine Nazi propaganda, answering questions on guide and completing a NARA sheet on two of the four pieces of propaganda seen on the link below:

http://fcit.coedu.usf.edu/holocaust/arts/ARTPROP.HTM
http://www.calvin.edu/academic/cas/gpa/moralpro.htm
These sites include examples of propaganda as well as an article on the “Moral Obligation” of propaganda from a 1936 newspaper

6. Students then look the following comments on the Jewish question by Hitler and other dignitaries, taking notes in the “L” section of the KWL worksheet
http://fcit.usf.edu/HOLOCAUST/resource/document/DocDec.htm

7. Using the SEA sheet, students will analyze the doctrines of the Nazi party, focusing on how the word choice of the party makes the ideals sound socially and morally acceptable.
http://www.justice.gov/usao/nj/Press/files/pdffiles/2009/Hull%20Complaint%2003-23-09.pdf


Assessment: After identifying key ideas and methods used to spread the idea of the propaganda, students will create a doctrine for an outlandish idea using propaganda and similar word choice to understand how the people of Germany were ultimately brain washed to believe that the Holocaust was justified.



Michelle's Lesson Plan Incorporating Primary Source Propaganda with a 5th Grade Literature Unit

Audience: 5th grade library students
Objectives:
1. The students will evaluate a primary source cartoon and document utilizing the SEA method.
2. The students will identify similarities between anti-slavery propaganda in primary sources and that in the novel Freedom Crossing.
3. The students will differentiate fact from propaganda in both the novel Freedom Crossing and primary source results.
-
-
Procedure:
-
1.. Introduction:
-
In our novel Freedom Crossing, our main character struggles with what she has learned as a young girl in the south and how it conflicts with what she learns after moving to the north. Laura has been told that all black slaves are happy and well treated, and that they do not want freedom. She has learned that runaway slaves are criminals who do not appreciate all they have been given. After spending time in the north and meeting Martin, a runaway slave, she learns that she has been misinformed.
-
2. Primary Source Evaluations:
-
A. View the following cartoon: http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3a51002. Use your SEA chart to evaluate it. After this, discuss with your reading partner how this cartoon is similar to the anti-slavery ideas Laura was brought up to believe in.
B. Read the text from James Henry Hammond’s speech to the U.S. Senate in 1858: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4h3439t.html. Use your SEA chart to evaluate it. What statements does Hammond make that are similar to those Laura was raised to believe?
-
3. Student directions for differentiating fact & propaganda:
On your paper, make two columns. On the left column make the title “falsehood.” On the right column make the title “truth.” Next, work with a partner to use the primary source information you gathered today, as well as examples from our novel, to list false ideas Laura was raised to believe. On the right hand side, list what she learned the truth to be.
-
-
Conclusion
Students will share examples of modern-day stereotypes, propaganda, or falsehoods that they have seen or heard, and they will contrast these with truth. (Full group discussion)



Liz's Lesson Plan Andrew Carnegies's Contributions to Pittsburgh

3-D-1
Documents, Data, and Cartoons Lesson Plan
Social Studies Lesson Plan
Topic: Our Pittsburgh Neighborhood: How Andrew Carnegie Made a Difference

Objectives:
Students will be able to compare industrial and science/cultural contributions.
Students will be able to analyze a social commentary.
Students will be able to use data to learn information, compare and contrast, and make inferences.
http://loc.gov/pictures/resource/cph.3a15036
http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cai.2a14442
http://paleobiology.si.edu/dinosaurs

Procedure:
Review the Pittsburgh neighborhoods and previous references and pictures to the steel industry. Introduce Andrew Carnegie. First show his picture. Then show the cartoon.
After, the teacher refers to the NARA worksheet for a more in depth discussion, the students will use the SEA worksheet to analyze the cartoon.
The students will then discuss some of the cultural contributions Andrew Carnegie gave to Pittsburgh, including the dinosaur exhibit at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History. The students will work with a partner. Each student will pick a dinosaur. On a KWL chart, the students will write (phonetically) what they know about their dinosaur and what they want to know about their dinosaur. We will then use the Smithsonian site to "research" facts about the dinosaurs. The students will complete the KWL charts. With their partners, the children will complete an SEA worksheet, comparing their dinosaurs.
Evaluation:
The final product will be a dinosaur poster of a drawing of a dinosaur with facts about that dinosaur. These will be displayed at our Dinosaur Music Show. The children sing five dinosaur songs for their families.
Critical Thinking Skills: Students will be comparing and contrasting. They will be drawing relationships and making connections. They will explore political humor as they analyze. They will judging the cartoon. They will be summarizing their "research."
This lesson will integrate with social studies in the neighborhood and communities unit, science in the dinosaur unit, and writing as they complete their graphic organizers..



Your Name's Lesson Plan

Enter Lesson Plan here.

Your Name's Lesson Plan

Enter Lesson Plan here.

Your Name's Lesson Plan

Enter Lesson Plan here.

Your Name's Lesson Plan

Enter Lesson Plan here.

Your Name's Lesson Plan

Enter Lesson Plan here.

Your Name's Lesson Plan

Enter Lesson Plan here.

Your Name's Lesson Plan

Enter Lesson Plan here.

Your Name's Lesson Plan

Enter Lesson Plan here.

Your Name's Lesson Plan

Enter Lesson Plan here.

Your Name's Lesson Plan

Enter Lesson Plan here.

Your Name's Lesson Plan

Enter Lesson Plan here.

Your Name's Lesson Plan

Enter Lesson Plan here.

Your Name's Lesson Plan

Enter Lesson Plan here.

Your Name's Lesson Plan

Enter Lesson Plan here.

Your Name's Lesson Plan

Enter Lesson Plan here.

Your Name's Lesson Plan

Enter Lesson Plan here.

Your Name's Lesson Plan

Enter Lesson Plan here.

Your Name's Lesson Plan

Enter Lesson Plan here.

Your Name's Lesson Plan

Enter Lesson Plan here.

Your Name's Lesson Plan

Enter Lesson Plan here.

Your Name's Lesson Plan

Enter Lesson Plan here.

Your Name's Lesson Plan

Enter Lesson Plan here.

Your Name's Lesson Plan

Enter Lesson Plan here.

Your Name's Lesson Plan

Enter Lesson Plan here.