Home > Learning Activity 4-C-1: Photos and Posters Lesson Plan



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Theresa's Lesson Plan

In keeping with Ridgway being established in the late 1800s, students will become aware of a unique American art form that developed at the same time, Ragtime.
Students will recognize and identify Ragtime music with its use of syncopation and improvisation as a uniquely American art form.

Before listening to examples of Ragtime music, students will study the picture and poster using the SEA chart. This will give students the opportunity to use the picture and poster to predict what the music might sound like. Students will then be told some of the intrinsic qualities of Ragtime (syncopation, improvisation, etc). Students will then experience the listening examples of a classic rag on the LOC web site http://lcweb2.loc.gov/diglib/ihas/loc.natlib.ihas.200035813/default.html . Last, the students will study Scott Joplin and his contributions to Ragtime music. Students will use the KWL chart along with a Bibliography of Scott Joplin to finish off this lesson on American music of the late 1800s.
There will be no final project for the students to work on other than listening to several Ragtime examples. Critical thinking is promoted with the use of the picture and the poster. Students have to look at these and analyze them to decide what something may sound like. This could really stir up some discussions especially since the class will have already been taught the song Five Cent Shave from the previous Modules and a lesson on jug bands from the book. This lesson is integrated with the rest of the music curriculum through the study of form, rhythm, and style.
joplin.jpg
joplin.jpg
ragtime.jpg
ragtime.jpg


Kellie DiBattista

Learning Activity 4-C-1
Photos and Posters Lesson Plan
Design a lesson plan using both photographs and posters.
Lesson Plan:
Subject areas: Reading and Social Studies
Objectives:
· students will compare and contrast their life in the United States to Sadako’s life in Japan
· Students will appreciate children’s efforts for peace
· Students will think critically about a selection of literature and apply their knowledge to a poster
Plan: Read aloud chapters 1-3 of Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes by Eleanor Coerr. Have students analyze photograph of Sadako with her classmates. Students will create a Venn diagram to compare Sadako’s class to our class.
Continue reading the novel to the end. Students will use the SEA worksheet to analyze the Poster “Steps Toward Peace”. We will discuss the photos in the poster and their meaning to Japan. Students will then plan and create their own American version of the poster.
I will show students the Children’s Peace Memorial in Hiroshima, Japan, that is a tribute to Sadako and encourages world peace. We will participate in the origami crane making activity and send our cranes in to the project.
What method will students use to analyze the photos and posters? (SEA or NARA worksheet)
For the photograph of Sadako’s class, I will have students complete a Venn diagram comparing our class of students to Sadako’s class. We will discuss the similarities and differences. Students will write a brief response to this prompt: After analyzing the photograph and discussing your Venn diagram with a partner, explain how Sadako’s class seems very similar to our own class”.
For the poster, I will have students use the SEA document to point out main parts of the poster. After analyzing the poster, students will discuss what they thought the different parts of the poster depicted, teacher will explain to class at the end of the discussion. Our class will then brainstorm what a U.S. poster might look like if we created one following the same theme. Students will create a poster using various United States events to illustrate the same title “Steps toward Peace”. We will again discuss the similarities and differences between our countries.
Will your students use a graphic organizer like a KWL chart or Venn diagram?
Students will use a Venn diagram for class photo and an SEA document for the poster.
•What final product will your students create, if any?
Students will create a poster of U.S. scenes and the slogan “Steps toward Peace” similar to Japan’s poster.
•How will your activity promote critical thinking skills?
The activity promotes critical thinking skills by having students analyze photographs and posters. Students will also compare, contrast, and come to conclusions after analyzing photos and creating their own poster.
•How will this lesson integrate with the rest of your curriculum?
Lesson will build background about Japan by analyzing photograph #1 after reading chapters 1-3 of Sadako and A Thousand Paper Cranes. Students will analyze the peace poster at the end of the novel, so it will tie Social Studies curriculum into our reading curriculum.
sadako_class.gif
sadako_class.gif

Sadako Sasaki is in the center of the front row
Photograph #1
Poster:
Steps_Toward_Peace_poster.jpg
Steps_Toward_Peace_poster.jpg

Children's_Peace_Memorial,_Hiroshima.jpg
Children's_Peace_Memorial,_Hiroshima.jpg

Photograph #2
"This is our cry. This is our prayer. Peace in the world."
Childrens’ Peace Memorial, Hiroshima, Japan

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Liz's Lesson Plan

http://images.library.pitt.edu/cgi-bin/i/image/image-idx?xc=1;g=imls;sort=dc_da;q1=posters;rgn1=ic_all;sid=bd35c1f6d76854990a8041f2f9670693;size=20;lasttype=boolean;view=entry;lastview=thumbnail;subview=detail;cc=hpichswp;entryid=x-msp78.b001.f16.i01;viewid=KAUF2626.TIF;start=1;resnum=7

http://images.library.pitt.edu/cgi-bin/i/image/image-idx?med=1;sid=a8fca765cc792935b78d1f7a588a2ea4;c=hpichswp;q1=MSP%2078;rgn1=hpichswp_ci;evl=full-image;quality=3;view=entry;subview=detail;lasttype=boolean;cc=hpichswp;entryid=x-msp78.b001.f21.i01;viewid=KAUF2630.TIF;start=1;resnum=13




This lesson will continue our study of Pittsburgh and her neighborhoods, past and present. This poster and photograph illustrate immigrants coming to Pittsburgh in one of the neighborhoods.
The poster and the photograph are artifacts of Pittsburgh’s past. The objective of the lesson will be that the students will be able to analyze and compare the two artifacts. The procedure will be to look at the poster and photograph and write down what we see, using the SEA(C) primary worksheet. We will do this whole group because of all the words in the poster. We will examine the poster and photograph asking Who? What? Where? Why? and add When? To analyze the artifacts, we’ll discuss why the artifacts were created. I’ll adapt the SEA(C) chart to add a comparison column rather than using another graphic organizer to compare the poster and the photograph. This way, the kindergarten children can make connections with the information on one graphic. Another graphic, at this point, would not hold their attention. Then, the children will break into small groups around the room to make a poster welcoming people to America as a final project. Their participation and their posters will be the evaluation.
This activity involves critical thinking skills. The children compare and contrast the photograph and poster; they infer the meaning of the symbols; they analyze the observations and evaluate what they might mean; and they apply and synthesize their learning by making a poster.
This lesson integrates with the curriculum in the social studies unit about our neighborhood. Students will learn how the different Pittsburgh neighborhoods began. It also includes shared writing. The poster connects the lesson to art.


Michelle's Lesson Plan


Lesson Title: Focus on Non-fiction in the Library: Kids at Work: Lewis Hine and the Crusade Against Child Labor by Russell Freedman (331.3).
For reference to the book profiled, visit http://www.historyplace.com/unitedstates/childlabor/hine-manuel.htm.
Objectives:
1. The students will discuss differences between the lives of children in the past and the lives of children in the present.
2. The students will analyze the reasons why a book is placed in a particular hundreds section of the library.
Introduction/Anticipatory Set:
1. Show children the “Manuel the Shrimp Picker” photograph, but do not give more information. Have students complete the KW portions of a KWL chart independently. http://www.thispublicaddress.com/depression/images/hine.jpg
2. Show children the “Human Junk” poster as a whole class. http://www.thispublicaddress.com/depression/images/hine.jpg Complete a KWL chart on the board. (K&W). Explain that there was a time in our history when children worked from dawn until midnight.
3. Provide background information on Manuel the shrimp picker. Children will be surprised to learn that he is working as a shrimp picker while only five years old, and that the mountain of shells behind him are oyster shells that were picked by other young children. This is a shock, as the children will have assumed that Manuel was visiting the shore, playing in the sand, etc. Have students complete the L part of the Manuel KWL.
Main Lesson Procedure:
1. Bring out the book Kids at Work. Explain that children’s lives in days gone by were very different than children’s lives today. Some nonfiction books give us a true vision into the past to see how different those times are.
2. Note that the call number is in the 300’s, social sciences. Social sciences also includes social problems.
3. Read through the book, exploring pictures and engaging in discussion.
4. Wrap the reading up by having children list several ways that children’s lives were different in the past.
Conclusion
1. Children complete the L column of their KWL charts for the “Human Junk” poster
2. Children explain why they it was appropriate for this book to be placed in the 300’s. (We bring this back to the poster—how the poster is working to fix a social problem, and how social issues are in the 300s).

This lesson involves critical thinking skills as students analyze and evaluate the photo, poster, and book. They make value judgements and bring together the elements of the lesson to identify child labor as a social problem.



Jenna's Lesson Plan

Objective: To enhance reading of The Things They Carried by Tim O' Brien, students will gain an understanding of the conflict within our country as the war raged on in Vietnam.
Procedure:
1. After understanding the conflict, teacher will discuss the dissent that was rising within the American people over the war, coupled with the Civil Rights movement,
2. Students will work in pairs, studying the three documents using NARA worksheets to focus on the types of people protesting, what the signs say and how the protests are presented, (passive vs. active)
3. After students gain information and draw conclusions about the protests, each pair will complete a KWL chart. Then, students will list questions about protests that they "want" to know.
4. For homework, teacher will assign each group with one question to answer using either textbook or internet sources.
5. On day two, students will present findings and teacher will continue lessons on the protests within the country, focusing on songs and poetry.

Assessment/final project: Students will give complete answers to questions on the "W" portion of worksheet.
Through analysis of print and song, students will be able to identify the key issues of protest and create a chart with these issues.
While reading the book, students will identify the presence of these issues as demonstrated through the action of the characters.
Final product: students will create a journal from the point of view of a protester or soldier based on the information studied.

This acivity will promote critical thinking skills because it will encourage the study of the politics, racial and social issues surrounding the war. Students will be putting themselves in the position of those
involved with the war and appreciate the passion of all who unfortunately had to witness it.

This activity will complement any study of war or political conflict in History class as well.


external image antiwar_protest_1006.jpgwww.time.com
Students Carrying Antiwar Signs While Marching in Protest of US Involvement in the Vietnam War Photographic Print
Students Carrying Antiwar Signs While Marching in Protest of US Involvement in the Vietnam War Photographic Print
www.time.com

external image 7546-004-7F54297C.jpg

www.loc.gov


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