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Theresa's Lesson Plan

Protests against Apartheid

http://player.discoveryeducation.com/index.cfm?guidAssetId=9BB2AEA1-9BB8-4669-AF6C-A11B4D28955C&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US

Students will sing and perform the dance for the song “Thula Klizeo”, which means “be still my heart even here I am at home”, by Joseph Shabalala.

I will start the lesson by asking the students if they have ever heard of the Apartheid. I will lead a discussion on how black South Africans were not considered equal to whites as late as the 1990s. I will pass out the KLW sheet so that students can fill out the first two columns prior to viewing the video. We will watch the short video from United Streaming entitled “Protests against Apartheid”. We would have a brief discussion after the video and students would fill out their last column.

After the video:
Shabalala’s music is from the South African Mbube tradition where music is never performed standing still. I will explain to the students that the Zulu stomp, a dance that could shake the earth, was banned during the Apartheid so they needed to develop a new dance so they would not get in trouble or be sent to jail. The new dance is called the Iscatameeya which means to stomp quietly, taking great pride in being who you are. At this point the students will learn the song and dance and perform them in small groups.


Liz's Lesson Plan

1902 map of Pittsburgh

http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.gmd/g3824p.pm008330

Primary Source: Pittsburgh map 1902

Summary:
This map is fascinating because of the zoom ability on the site and the detail in the map. The zoom power reveals a baseball game and bleachers on the North Side, old inclines, horses and buggies on the street, a streetcar going over a bridge, numbers labeling the buildings and railroads, a bicycle, and the site of the Exposition that year with the figure 8 ride, and more. This site would be perfect for the SmartBoard so the children could interact with the map and see a bigger picture. It is also perfect for kindergarten because it is a picture map. It shows Pittsburgh during Andrew Carnegie’s time.
PA Standards:
7.1.1 Students will be able to identify basic geographic tools: map, globe, and photograph.
7.1.2 Students will be able to describe types of homes and businesses located in the community.
Essential Questions: How do I find buildings, landmarks, and other objects on a map?
What does the map tell me about Pittsburgh in 1902?

Materials: SmartBoard Differentiated “Scavenger Hunt” papers
Objective: Students will be able to identify the map. Students will be able to describe and locate buildings, rivers, landmarks, and objects on the map.
Procedure: Discuss and demonstrate the use of the map as a whole group. Locate a few things that they have already examined in photographs, such as the Smithfield Street Bridge. Show them the “scavenger hunt” papers. The children would work together on the map in partners during centers. At center time, review the directions and teach the partners how to zoom in and out and how to use the red box in the little Navigation Box to focus on an area of the larger map. They have used the SmartBoard so are familiar with it. I would let the children explore the map before giving them items to find on their scavenger hunt paper. After everyone has had a chance to work on the map, which may take a few days, we will meet again as a whole group to discuss our findings and questions and conclusions.
Evaluation: Participation. Completion of the scavenger hunt paper.


Michelle's Lesson Plan


Patronization and Sexism in Commercials.

Objective:
The students will identify patronization and sexism in two commercials.
The students will identify patronization and sexism in modern commercials.
Procedures:
1. Begin with a discussion of what patronization looks like. What are sexist views?
2. Discuss why patronization or sexism would work in advertising.
3. Discuss how sexist or patronizing students consider modern commercials to be.
4. Students view two commercials from the website http://www.classictvads.com/classicindex.shtml. These commercials are “Maxwell House (196?)” and “Prell (197?).” (See the links on the right, half way down the page.) Students will complete a SEAC form for these two commercials.
5. Discuss how these commercials made the students feel. Did they think they were effective? Do they think our current commercials will seem offensive to people in forty or fifty years? What are the disadvantages of these types of commercials? What are students’ opinions of these commercials, ethically?
6. For conclusion, have students make predictions of how many modern examples of patronization/sexism they will find in an evening of prime-time network television.
Independent Practice & Follow-Up Instruction:
Students have one week to view two hours of prime time television and track the commercials they see for examples of patronization and sexism. They are to bring the results of their personal research to class, where a follow-up lesson will occur that graphs their results and discusses whether patronization and sexism are problems in modern commercials.


Jenna's Lesson Plan

The Ripple Effects of the LA Riots


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wc_SgpyJWRY


While reading Twilight, Los Angeles, which is a play written on the LA Riots of 1992, students will understand the ripple effects of the RodneyKing beating,

Procedure:
1. Students will have background on the events of the riot in preparation for reading. Then, they will read several short character poems.
2. Students will use the an adapted NARA worksheet for photographs- this seems to fit for analysis of the news video better than the movie analysis sheet.
3. Since there are no names mentioned on the video, students will write a short journal entry on the event from the point of view of (a) the attacker (b) Denny (c) the news reporter
4. Students will share their findings with the class, then teacher will tell them the identity of Denny.
5. Students will then read and analyze character poem about Denny

Conclusion
Students will discuss Denny's story along with that of shopowners and other innocent victims of the riots to fully appreciate the horrific events of April 1992


Kellie's Lesson Plan

Know Your Earth Lesson on climate change and NASA satellites
http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/videogallery/index.html
�Know Your Earth� NASA video
Learning Activity 6-C-1
Video or Map Lesson Plan
Objectives:
Students will be able to name at least 3 NASA satellites
Students will explain at least 3 things NASA satellites report on
Students will be able to report at least 3 measurable changes to Earth can be monitored by NASA satellites or scientists
Lesson Plan:
We will begin with a discussion of Earth�s climate. Students will brainstorm definitions of climate, we will choose the best one and copy it to science notebooks. We will then discuss how scientists can study climate. What sorts of tools do scientists use to study climate?
Students will complete the KW section of a KWL chart titled �NASA studies Earth�s climate�
Students will then watch the video titled �Know Your Earth� and then complete the L section of their KWL chart with a partner. Each student will use an exit slip titled �Most interesting thing learned about Earth�s climate is��


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